Bagram: The First Ever Prisoner List (The Annotated Version)

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UPDATE: This list was extensively updated on the weekend of April 2-3, 2011, when the results of around 100 Detainee Review Boards were added from documents secured by the ACLU through FOIA requests, and around 100 new cases were added, of prisoners seized since this list was compiled in September 2009. There is more information to be added when I can find the time, as I have only completed transcripts of Set 1 of the 7 Sets listed under “10/11/2010 – Commander’s Final Decision Memos” and have so far added two-thirds of the important documents at “10/29/2010 – More complete documents relating to an illustrative sample of 60 DRB hearings” (which I published on April 5, and on April 16, and then added here).

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On Friday January 15, 2010, the Pentagon responded to a FOIA request submitted by the ACLU last April, and released the first ever list of 645 prisoners held, as of September 22, 2009, in the US prison at Bagram airbase in Afghanistan (the Bagram Theater Internment Facility).

In the hope of making the list more readily accessible — and searchable — than it is through a poorly photocopied Pentagon document, I reproduce it below, with commentary on some the prisoners I have been able to identify. This is very much a work-in-progress, of course, as the state of knowledge regarding Bagram is akin to that regarding Guantánamo back in 2005, before the prisoner lists and 8,000 pages of documents were released that allowed me to research and write my book The Guantánamo Files, and to begin a new career as a full-time journalist on Guantánamo and related issues.

In an article accompanying the publication of this list, “Dark Revelations in the Bagram Prisoner List,” I examined what the list — which contains only the prisoners’ names, and not their nationalities or the date and place of their capture — reveals about the small number of foreign prisoners rendered to Bagram from other countries, three of whom are currently waiting to see if the Court of Appeals will overturn the right to habeas corpus that was granted to them by Judge John D. Bates last March, and raise questions about the whereabouts of other known “ghost prisoners” who do not appear to have been included on the list.

In an article to follow, I’ll examine how the list reveals not only that around 3,000 prisoners have been held at Bagram in the last six years, but also how the majority of the prisoners listed here were seized in 2008 and 2009 — and I’ll examine what this means with regard to the US administration’s detention policies and the Geneva Conventions, which were discarded by George W. Bush and have clearly not been reintroduced by Barack Obama.

Although I believe that I have had some success tracking down the stories of some of the 100 or so prisoners on the list who have been held at Bagram for between three and seven years, I have found few clues as to the identities of the majority of those listed, who, as mentioned above, were seized in the last two years. Most reports — by the US military or the media — of raids or skirmishes that led to the capture of those held have not furnished the names of those seized, and on the rare occasion that names have been provided it has tended to be because they are regarded as significant figures.

I have no idea whether the allegations against these men are true, but, more importantly, I have not failed to notice that the majority of the prisoners (often men identified by only one name) are clearly not significant figures at all, and my fear — which, I have no doubt, will be confirmed when more information emerges — is that many of them will be revealed to be victims of the same chaotic approach to the capture of prisoners that has done so much to lose the battle for the “hearts and minds” of the people of Afghanistan and Iraq for the last eight years, and which, with regard to the 218 prisoners seized in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2003 and sent to Guantánamo, I chronicled in The Guantánamo Files.

A clear sign that this is indeed the case came in August 2009, when Maj. Gen. Doug Stone, commissioned by Gen. David Petraeus to review detention policies in Afghanistan, produced a report in which he estimated that “as many as 400 of the 600 held at Bagram can be released,” explaining that “many of these men were swept up in raids” and “have little connection to the insurgency.”

If you have any further information about any of these men, please feel free to email me, and I will incorporate the information into the list.

Bagram: the prisoner list

The first three prisoners listed are referred to by their prisoner numbers at Guantánamo. All three were seized after their release from Guantánamo and imprisoned in Bagram.

459: Gul Zaman. He was released from Guantánamo in April 2005. The circumstances of his recapture are unknown. In The Guantánamo Files, I wrote, “Three members of a family of farmers — 59-year old Abib Sarajuddin, his 30-year old son Gul Zaman and his 39-year old brother Khan Zaman — were captured by US soldiers in a village near Khost in January 2002, allegedly because someone had fired on them, although the men, who were released in 2005 and 2006, said that the soldiers, who arrived at night by helicopter, broke into their houses and arrested them for no reason.”

831: Khadan Kadir. Also identified as Qadir Khandan, he was released from Guantánamo in October 2006. The circumstances of his recapture are unknown. In The Guantánamo Files, I wrote, “Arrested at his home in September 2002 and accused of running a safe house for a bomb-making cell, Khandan pointed out that he was working for the Karzai government in the National Security Office in Khost, and that, as a pharmacist, bombs were ‘truly against my ideology.’ He also explained that he was badly abused by American soldiers in a prison in Khost. ‘They put tight round glasses around my eyes, had my ears shut with plugs and I was covered with a bag,’ he said, adding, ‘I was ordered to stand up 24 hours for 20 days in a row. I had blood coming out of my body and my nose for days because I was tortured so much.’ Describing what appear to be otherwise unreported murders in US custody, he also said, ‘I saw four people die right in front of me.’”

1001: Hafizullah Shabaz Khail. Also identified as Hafizullah Shabaz Khiel, he was released from Guantánamo in December 2007. A 56-year old pharmacist from Zormat, south of Gardez, he had been approached by the town elders after Hamid Karzai first came to power as the head of the interim post-Taliban government, and served as the mayor for six months until an official appointment was made. He then continued to help out with security. “While I was mayor in Zormat,” he said, “there were no problems with the Americans. I met with American commanders several times … We even took pictures together.” He was apparently seized by US forces because of false information provided by a rival, Abdullah Mujahid Haq (who also ended up in Guantánamo).

On his return, he was cleared of all charges by the Afghan government, but in February 2009 the Associated Press reported that he had been seized again during a nighttime raid on his home in September 2008, and noted, pointedly that his story “shows just how difficult it is for the US to determine who is guilty and who is not in Afghanistan, where corruption rules and grudges are held for years, if not decades.”

This time around, he was accused of “treating sick Taliban as a pharmacist,” but as the AP noted, “Some Afghans claim the US is far too quick to arrest people without understanding the complexities of the culture.” Ishaq Gailani, a member of President Hamid Karzai’s government, explained, “We are fed up. Bagram is full of these people who are wrongly accused. They arrest everyone — a 15-year-old boy and a 61-year-old man. They arrest them because they run away from their helicopters … I would run away too if I saw them. They don’t know who is the terrorist and who is not.” As the AP described it, “Zormat elders, leading clerics, the provincial governor, the National Reconciliation Bureau and two members of Parliament have signed documents attesting to Hafizullah’s innocence.” The report also explained, “Family members fear a decades-old feud involving a distant cousin, Fazle Rabi, may have been behind the nighttime raid on Hafizullah’s home.”

On February 11, 2010, after his Detainee Review Board, a more senior military figure directed “that he be reintegrated into the Afghan community.” The report explained, “This case is based on reports that Hafizullah supplied the Taliban with emergency medical assistance and supplies on 23 August 2008, 4 days before his [re]capture. He denies that this ever happened and there was no evidence recovered at the scene of capture to corroborate this allegation. In addition, there is no evidence that Dr. Hafizullah provided medical supplies outside of the medical care rendered to Taliban members.”

He added, “I find that even if Hafizullah treated persons wounded on the battlefield, he acted to a general humanitarian obligation. At the same time, he had an obligation to report Taliban activities to the authorities. Given the lack of evidence in this case, the extenuating circumstances of his alleged support for the Taliban, and his 18 months at the DFIP, there is little to no chance he would be charged if transferred to ANDF [the Afghan National Detention Facility in Kabul]. Accordingly, I direct that he be reintegrated into the Afghan community.”

For the rest of the Bagram prisoners, their prisoner numbers appear to have carried on from the last numbers given to prisoners sent to Guantánamo. The last was Mohammed Mussa, sent to Guantánamo in November 2003, and his detainee number was 1165.

1207: Haji Pacha Wazir. A Pakistani living in the United Arab Emirates, where he ran an international chain of hawalas, Wazir was suspected of being a major money handler for al-Qaeda. In September 2002, as described by Ron Suskind in his book The One Percent Doctrine, the UAE government froze millions of dollars of his assets and informed him that he was under investigation by the FBI. Although Wazir asked to meet with FBI representatives to persuade them that he was innocent, he was kidnapped by CIA agents en route to the meeting.

After failing to provide useful information under interrogation in the UAE, his brother was then seized, but he provided no useful information either. The CIA then kidnapped two of Wazir’s employees operating a store in Karachi, Pakistan, replacing them with CIA agents of Pakistani descent, who allegedly secured information leading to the capture of “dozens” of key figures. Wazir and the other three men were apparently rendered to a CIA black site, but only Wazir surfaced at Bagram, and the whereabouts of the others is unknown.

In July 2009, Haji Wazir’s habeas corpus petition was denied by US District Court Judge John D. Bates.

1209: Lutfi al-Arabi al-Gharisi. According to a report compiled by Abu Yahya al-Libi, a prisoner who escaped from Bagram in July 2005, one of the prisoners who was held with him was a Tunisian, Abou Houdayfa, whose first name, according to al-Libi, was Lotfi. Captured in Peshawar, Pakistan, at the end of 2002, he was reportedly held in several CIA prisons in Afghanistan, including the “Dark Prison,” before being moved to Bagram. It’s also probable that he is “Hudeifa,” a Tunisian prisoner mentioned by Marwan Jabour, who was also held in several secret prisons, but was released in 2006. He later told his story to Human Rights Watch, who published it as a report, “Ghost Prisoner,” in February 2007.

1220: Arsala Khan
1282: Saifullah Abdul Wali. See ISN 2505, below.

1286: Malang Zafar. A man of this name was seized in December 2003 by Gurkhas, and was described as a “chief of operations” for Hezb-e-Islami Gulbuddin (HIG), a fiercely anti-US group headed by Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, a veteran warlord who, ironically, received the lion’s share of CIA funding in the 1980s, via Pakistan’s Inter Services Intelligence agency (ISI). According to a report in the Independent in December 2003, he was “suspected of organizing a bus bombing in June that killed four German soldiers” and the circumstances of his capture were described as follows: “Attempting to escape from a police checkpoint in Kabul, Malang Zafar Khan drove his pick-up truck straight at the gunpoints of the British Army Gurkhas. They had been waiting for the man sent to blow up the loya jirga, the national constitutional assembly that starts today.”

1287: Gulam Rabbani Abu Bakr. A man of this name was seized in 2003 by Afghan forces and a West Midlands regiment of Territorial Army soldiers, and was reportedly a HIG commander “believed to have been behind a series of car bombings in Kabul.”

On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that detainee 1287 should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for criminal prosecution.

1288: Qalam. A man of this name was seized with four others in a raid in Kabul in September 2003, and was reportedly a former HIG commander. An Associated Press report explained: “Khalil Aminzada, deputy chief of police of Kabul, said Tuesday that two suspects were arrested in the capital on Monday by Afghan authorities acting with some foreigners. Aminzada was not sure if the foreigners were from ISAF or the United States. He identified one suspect as Qalam, allegedly a former commander of rebel leader Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, but did not name the other and or elaborate on what they were suspected of plotting.” Pakistan’s Daily Times reported that Qalam was seized with four other men.

1432: Ahmad Dilshad. A man named Dilshad Ahmad, an alleged leader of the proscribed Pakistani terrorist organization Lashkar-e-Tayyiba, was “arrested in Iraq by British forces, and then given over to the US for interrogation,” according to a report in Asia Times in July 2004, which noted that the first report of his capture was in April 2004, and that he “went under several aliases, including Danish Ahmad and Abdul Rehman al-Dakhil.” SATP added that he was seized in Baghdad with four other men.

1433: Salah Mohammad Ali. A Pakistani prisoner, who was just 20 years old when he was seized in Lahore at the end of 2003 or the start of 2004, Ali had to wait six and a half years until a Detainee Review Board recommended, on June 5, 2010, that he should be released in Pakistan, as I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three). From limited statements made available by the US authorities, it seemed that Ali had been “brainwashed” at a madrassa and recruited for jihad against US forces. It is not known if he is still held, or if he has been released.

Originally, I thought that ISN 1433 might be the man identified by Abu Yahya al-Libi (an al-Qaeda member who escaped from Bagram in July 2005) as Salah Din al-Bakistani, who lived in Doha, Qatar. According to al-Libi, he was seized in Iraq in 2004, and was apparently held in Abu Ghraib and another “torture prison.” Salah Din was identified by the legal action charity Reprieve as Salahuddin and was apparently seized by British forces and transferred to Bagram with another Pakistani, a rice merchant named Amanatullah Ali. Reprieve later learned that Salahuddin was a nickname, and that his real name is Yunus Rahmatullah. However, no one of either name is on the Bagram prisoner list, even though it is clear, from letters received by his family, that Amanatullah Ali is being held at Bagram, and also that Yunis Rahmatullah (Salahuddin) is held there as well.

According to Reprieve, which sued the Pakistani government in October 2010 for its “role in the illegal abduction, rendition and detention” of Salahuddin (Yunus Rahmatullah) and six other Pakistanis held at Bagram, Salahuddin, who was brought up in the Gulf states, “has not been able to contact his family or even reassure them that he is alive.” Reprieve also noted that, through various sources, they have been told that, “as a result of his abuse in UK and US custody, Salahuddin is in catastrophic mental and physical shape, and now spends most of his time in the mental health cells at Bagram.”

1442: Haji Ghulam Farooq. He was released, with nine other men, on May 15, 2010, after three years in custody. On his release, he explained that “he was afraid he was forever tarnished as a suspect who could be scooped up again at any time,” as a McClatchy report described it. Accused of working with Taliban insurgents, he told US officials, “I was a mujahideen commander. It didn’t make sense for me to be against this government.”

1456: Moez Bin Abdul Qadir Fezzani. From his name, it appears that this prisoner is Tunisian, but what is confusing is that a prisoner with the same name (Moez Ben Abdelkader Fezzani, also identified as Abou Nassim) is held in Guantánamo, where he appears to be identified as Abdul bin Mohammed bin Ourgy. On December 20, following the transfer of two Tunisians from Guantánamo to Italian custody (one of whom, Adel Ben Mabrouk, was also identified in June as Moez Fezzani), Italian TV stations reported that Fezzani was “being moved to Italy to face international terrorism charges for having allegedly recruited fighters for Afghanistan,” although the transfer has not yet taken place.

1464: Mohammed Amin al-Bakri (Yemeni). Seized in Thailand at the end of 2002, he was reportedly held in three secret CIA prisons before Bagram, according to Abu Yahya al-Libi, the al-Qaeda leader who escaped from Bagram in July 2005. In March 2009, his habeas corpus petition was granted by US District Court Judge John D, Bates, but the ruling was overturned by the Court of Appeals (the D.C. Circuit Court) in May 2010, as I explained in an article, The Black Hole of Bagram. In his habeas petition, he is identified as Amin Mohammed Abdallah al-Bakri.

On February 10, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, and also assessed him as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

1466: Ridha Ahmad Najjar (Tunisian). Seized in Karachi, Pakistan in May 2002, he was reportedly held in four secret CIA prisons before Bagram, according to Abu Yahya al-Libi, the al-Qaeda leader who escaped from Bagram in July 2005. In March 2009, his habeas corpus petition was granted by US District Court Judge John D, Bates, but the ruling was overturned by the Court of Appeals (the D.C. Circuit Court) in May 2010, as I explained in an article, The Black Hole of Bagram. In his habeas petition, he is identified as Redha al-Najar.

1474: Amal Khan. A man of this name, a Pakistani, is one of seven Pakistanis in Bagram represented by the London-based legal action charity Reprieve, which, with local partners, sued the Pakistani government in October 2010 for its “role in the illegal abduction, rendition and detention of the men.” According to Reprieve, “Amal Khan’s mother breaks down each time she tries to speak to her son via the International Committee of the Red Cross.”

1503: Noor Agha
1658: Zahir Jan
1691: Mohammed Ayoob
1718: Hafezullah Jan

1815: Fadi Ahmed (Yemeni). Presumably this is Fadi al-Maqaleh, a Yemeni, seized in 2004, who was sent to Abu Ghraib before Bagram, according to Abu Yahya al-Libi, the al-Qaeda leader who escaped from Bagram in July 2005. In March 2009, his habeas corpus petition was granted by US District Court Judge John D, Bates, but the ruling was overturned by the Court of Appeals (the D.C. Circuit Court) in May 2010, as I explained in an article, The Black Hole of Bagram.

1869: Hamidullah
1877: Abdul Rahman

1897: Fazel Karim. This is a long shot, but a man named Fazal Karim, apparently a former mujahideen fighter in Afghanistan, was in custody in Pakistan, in February 2003, in connection with the murder of Daniel Pearl. As Reuters explained, “Two LeJ members, Naeem Bokhari and Fazal Karim, both in undeclared custody, are suspected of helping in Pearl’s kidnap and murder, intelligence sources say.” In his autobiography, President Musharraf described Karim as a “militant activist,” and stated that he was captured in May 2002, and that he led investigators to Pearl’s body, and also helped direct them to Khalid Sheikh Mohammed’s alleged involvement in the killing. Musharraf stated that Karim did not know who KSM was — only that he was “Arab-looking” — but this may have been enough for the US authorities to wish to interrogate him in Afghanistan. Also see this report in TIME.

2273: Molvia Hamidullah
2284: Abdul Basset Zadran
2321: Babarak
2343: Samiullah
2369: Jamshir Khan
2401: Mohammad Anwar

2421: Raiz. A man of this name — Haji Raiz, described as “a key terrorist leader” — was captured in July 2007. A report explained, “Police searches also confiscated bomb-making material from Raiz, described by coalition forces as a major improvised explosive device facilitator for both the Taliban and al-Qaeda.”

2422: Abdul Kabir
2463: Dost Mohammed

2505: Abdul Alim. This may be Abdul Haleem Saifullah, a Pakistani, and one of seven Pakistanis in Bagram represented by the London-based legal action charity Reprieve, which, with local partners, sued the Pakistani government in October 2010 for its “role in the illegal abduction, rendition and detention of the men.” According to Reprieve, “The father of Abdul Haleem Saifullah, upon learning that his son was in Bagram, became so sick with worry that he died one year later.” For another possible match, see ISN 1282, above.

2521: Sayed Gulab. A man of this name was seized in May 2007. A report explained, “Afghan Border Police, advised by Coalition forces, detained a Taliban leader in the Pachir Wa Agam district of Nangarhar province during an operation May 24. After receiving information on the whereabouts of Sayed Gulab, a notorious Nangarhar Taliban area commander and improvised explosive device cell facilitator, ABP members quickly moved to the village of Shir Wagan and detained him. Gulab is currently being held for questioning in a Coalition detention facility.”

2615: Sham Ali Khan

2619: Shafiq. In Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), I explained how, on October 8, 2009, a Detainee Review Board concluded that Shafiq, assessed as “an insurgent member” who had “been involved in coalition attacks,” should be transferred to the Afghan authorities “for participation in a reconciliation program.”

2633: Enayatullah
2634: Mohammed Agha
2635: Sher Jan

2638: Mullah Abdullah. In Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), I explained how, on October 8, 2009, a Detainee Review Board concluded that Mullah Abdullah, assessed as “a low-level Taliban member and informant,” should be transferred to the Afghan authorities “for criminal prosecution,” even though he protested that there was no evidence against him, and complained because, he said, no one had asked him anything during four years of imprisonment.

2650: Shad Gul
2660: Abdul Ghafor
2667: Haji Said Nabi
2689: Zabit Yasin
2720: Mohammed Rahim Noori
2724: Mohammed Yosef Noori
2737: Lalay Mohammed
2773: Noor Wali
2784: Niyaz
2802: Wali Jan
2825: Farooq
2827: Gulam Farooq
2842: Keramat
2904: Mohammed Layaq
2908: Haji Najmuddin
2910: Abdul Wali
2965: Abdul Ghafar
2974: Feroz Khan
2977: Enamullah
2978: Ali Sadar
3014: Abdul Karim
3015: Palik Jan
3028: Mohammed Wali
3034: Abdul Qadir
3066: Abdul Zahir
3068: Mohammed Kadir
3070: Hamid Gul
3086: Rahmatullah
3088: Bismullah Abdullah
3094: Mohammed Hassan Khan

3096: Awal Noor. A Pakistani, he is one of seven Pakistanis in Bagram represented by the London-based legal action charity Reprieve, which, with local partners, sued the Pakistani government in October 2010 for its “role in the illegal abduction, rendition and detention of the men.” According to Reprieve, his family, who “relied on the income he earned as a goat-herder,” have been “struggl[ing] to make ends meet” since his capture.

3111: Gul Agha
3112: Akhtar Gul

3154: Qari Mohmand. In Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), I explained that, on October 8, 2009, a Detainee Review Board concluded that Mohmand, captured on February 6, 2007 and “assessed to be an insurgent facilitator,” should be transferred to the Afghan authorities “for criminal prosecution,” even though he protested his innocence, and maintained that he was “only a farmer.”

3160: Nazir Khan
3167: Gul Shezad Khan
3170: Akbar Shah
3197: Sultan Ghul
3205: Hadaytullah
3207: Noor Hassan
3222: Saleh al-Afghani
3226: Ghulam Sawar Jamili
3246: Abdul Raziq

3264: Haji Mohammed. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3273: Said Wali Jan. In Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), I explained that, on June 7, 2010, a Detainee Review Board concluded that Jan should continue to be held at Parwan, because of his alleged involvement in a suicide mission, even though he presented a plasible explanation that he was nothing more than a baker.

3278: Haji Qayum Boi
3279: Maulawi Hafizullah
3281: Aka Khan
3303: Mohammed Gul
3305: Shadi Khan
3306: Nur Bacha

3308: Kahn Muhamad. On March 22, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities, but a more senior military figure directed that he should continue to be detained.

3310: Gul Mar Jan. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3314: Maulawi Ahmad Jan. A man of this name was seized on September 9, 2007. CJTF-82 reported in a press release, “Afghan National Police, advised by Coalition forces, detained the Taliban district commander of Andar, Ghazni and four others in an operation designed to disrupt insurgent activities in Ghazni Province early this morning. Maulawi Ahmad Jan is known to be extensively involved in the coordination of insurgent activities in Ghazni Province. He has directed IED and ambush attacks against ANSF and Coalition forces throughout the region. During the search of Ahmad Jan’s compound, ANP discovered a weapons and ammunition cache. No shots were fired during the operation and no non-combatants were harmed. ‘With Ahmad Jan now detained, Ghazni will be a less dangerous place,’ said Army Maj. Chris Belcher, a Combined Joint Task Force-82 spokesperson. ‘Information gained as a result of Ahmad Jan’s capture will undoubtedly result in further interdiction of Taliban fighters and leaders in the area.’”

As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), on September 24, 2009, in his Detainee Review Board, it was decided that Jan did not meet the criteria for internment, and that he should be released without conditions. In the closest the US authorities can come to admitting that a mistake was made, it was stated that “He was but no longer is assessed to be a Taliban commander.”

3316: Mullah Abdul Malik Akund
3343: Gologai
3345: Gul Hanan
3346: Alam
3355: Gul Zaman
3362: Izatullah
3363: Hazrat Wali
3364: Mullah Qadim
3366: Ali Mohammed
3378: Qari Said Daud
3383: Hajji Abdul Rahman Hoteq
3400: Sher Rahman
3401: Abdul Qadir
3402: Haji Amir
3404: Malik Azizurahman
3406: Gawhar Ali

3409: Abdul Satar. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3410: Akeeb Khan
3417: Rohullah
3418: Daud Zahir
3422: Maulawi Ahmad Zahir Arab
3437: Momen Khan
3438: Gul Inam Toryalay

3439: Mohammad Daud Gulzar. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3444: Juma Gul

3445: Pacha Khan. A man of this name was released with a number of other prisoners in March 2010. Described as an illiterate baker from Kunar Province, he said he was “still puzzled about why he had been detained in the first place, let alone held for three years,” and stated, “I was innocent. Spies took money and sold me to the Americans. The Americans treated us very well, but as you know, jail is a big thing — to be away from your family, your relatives.” A Detainee Review Board recommended his release on February 24, 2010.

3446: Nasimullah Khan
3447: Mohammad Zahir

3451: Amanullah Khal. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), he was recommended for prosecution by the Afghan authorities at his Detainee Review Board on September 24, 2009, even though he insisted that he was “a poor farmer.”

3452: Sakhi Jan
3453: Saleh Mohammad
3454: Ismail Malim
3463: Shams Khan
3464: Rais Mohammad

3466: Haji Zeni Khel. On March 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3468: Mullah Shabir. A man of this name was described in a military report in March 2008 as “a Taliban leader detained during a Feb. 25 joint operation in Ghazni province,” who “is believed to have provided intelligence, logistical support and improvised explosive devices to Taliban forces. He also is believed to be responsible for recent rocket attacks throughout Ghazni province, officials said.”

3469: Khan Mohammad. On February 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3470: Abdul Anan. On March 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

3474: Torakay
3479: Qari Arif

3483: Mak Mali Jan. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), his release without conditions was recommended at a Detainee Review Board on October 1, 2009. The authorities seemed to recognize, as Jan claimed, that he was a schools inspector, seized by mistake. By the time of his DRB, he had probably been held for around 18 months.

3484: Mohammed Hussein

3485: Qari Abdul Wali. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), his release without conditions was recommended at a Detainee Review Board on October 8, 2009. Although it was stated that he was “reported as a Taliban facilitator,” this was clearly not the case. By the time of his DRB, he had probably been held for around 18 months.

3486: Abdul Nafi
3494: Hayatullah
3496: Khan Gul
3497: Nik Mohammad
3498: Sheikh Yousef Soup
3499: Shaswar Mohammad Nader
3503: Mohammad Ghanam
3505: Sher Bader
3509: Izatullah

3510: Hajj Abdul Majid Khan. A man of this name was detained in March 2008. On April 30, 2008, CJTF-82 announced in a press release, “Coalition forces have released the identity of an insurgent detained during an operation conducted last month to disrupt militant operations in Zabul province. The insurgent, Hajji Abdul Majid Khan, was apprehended during the operation in Qalat District. Khan, 55, was detained March 3 during an operation targeting him. Khan, aka Majid Khan, was a Taliban financier and IED facilitator in Zabul province. He is known to have planned and conducted IED attacks against Coalition forces, harbored and facilitated suicide bombers and raised finances for Taliban operations.”

3511: Wali Gul

3569: Mir Khan. On January 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

3570: Abdul Ghafar
3572: Ajab
3574: Mujahid Farooq
3575: Mujib Rahman
3576: Mullah Zarbat

3577: Hajji Leewan Gul. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

3578: Haji Abdul Jalil

3580: Mahajir Ziarahman. A man of this name was detained in April 2008. On April 25, 2008, it was reported: “US-led coalition forces on Friday said two militants detained in the south-eastern province of Khost who were behind suicide bombing targeting Afghan and coalition forces, were identified as members of the Haqanni network, a former mujahideen party that fought invading Russian troops. The two militants, identified as Baitullah and Mahajir Ziarahman, were apprehended during an operation in Sabari district targeting the Haqanni network and improvised explosive device (IED) cells, said a military statement issued from the US base in Bagram. Baitullah, 34, was the target of the operation. He was a member of a Haqanni network based in Sabari that conducted the suicide bombing of the Sabari District Centre last month. According to the statement, Siraj Haqqani, the leader of the Haqqani Network, claimed responsibility for the bombing, added the statement. Mahajir Ziarahman, 23, was also a member of the same Sabari-based IED cell and is Biatullah’s brother. Ziarahman has emplaced IEDs targeting Afghan Security Forces and coalition forces in Khowst province, the statement added.” It is not known what happened to Baitullah.

This is almost certainly an accurate description of the prisoner in question, because a revised prisoner list issued in October 2010 (PDF) included his date and place of arrest (April 2, 2008, in Khost). On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3582: Mullah Toor Jan
3583: Mullah Hamayun Akhund
3584: Qazi Khan
3585: Sadar Wali
3586: Gul Khan
3587: Montaz
3588: Arifullah

3590: Mulla Salim. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3594: Safatullah. On February 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3595: Mullah Dabazoray. On February 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3596: Shah Khalid. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be “transferred to Afghan authorities for their consideration of his prosecution.” Reviewing the decision, a more senior military figure then ordered that he should “continue to be interned at the Justice Center in Parwan (JCIP) and considered for prosecution locally by Afghan prosecutors and judges in the JCIP.”

3600: Suhabi Rahman

3601: Zhar Mohammad. On February 6, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that, although continued internment was necessary, he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3603: Mohammad Ismael Saqib. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3605: Mohammad Gul. On February 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3606: Peera Jan

3607: Akbar Khan. On March 4, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3608: Shah Khan. On March 4, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — probably for participation in the rehabilitation program, although this was not made clear.

3609: Aziz Ur-Rahman. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3610: Farooq
3612: Haji Satar

3614: Rais Khan. On February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3615: Abdul Haq. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3616: Agha Mohammad. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3617: Wali Jan

3618: Mir Qalim. On February 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that, although he met detention criteria, internment was not necessary to mitigate the threat that he posed, and he should be released.

3620: Tariq

3622: Mohamaad Yousef. On February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably at the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3624: Sibghatullah Jalazai. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

3625: Abdul Basir. On February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3626: Rhamatullah. On February 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

3629: Abdul Khaliq. According to a revised prisoner list released in October 2010 (PDF), he was seized in Paktika province on June 6, 2008.

3632: Rashid Ahmed. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3633: Samiullah Jalalzai

3634: Mulvi Nasim. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3636: Fazel Gul
3637: Mullah Mohammad Akram
3639: Abdul Baghi
3641: Gul Maroof
3643: Mullah Faizoni

3645: Karimullah Sherzai. On February 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

3646: Qari Yousef
3647: Hajji Nabeeb

3648: Mohammad Shah. On March 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3658: Hamidullah. This is possibly Hamidullah Khan, a Pakistani, and one of seven Pakistanis in Bagram represented by the London-based legal action charity Reprieve, which, with local partners, sued the Pakistani government in October 2010 for its “role in the illegal abduction, rendition and detention of the men” (although it is also possible that one of the other Hamidullahs — see ISNs 3718 and 3881, below — is Hamidullah Khan). According to Reprieve, he was just 14 when he was picked up in July 2008 after traveling from Karachi to his father’s village in Waziristan to salvage the family’s possessions. As Reprieve also explained, “His friend, Khairullah, traveled with him by bus from Karachi up till Dir Ismail Khan. When Hamidullah parted with his friend, he told him to wait for his return from Waziristan within two days so they could travel back to Karachi together. Khairullah never saw Hamidullah again and since then his family has been desperate for his return. Hamidullah’s mother, Din Roza is desperate for his return and continues to fast from dawn till dusk even during the scorching summer months of Karachi with the hope that her prayers are answered and her son is returned to her.”

3659: Jamal. On March 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — for “consideration of criminal prosecution.”

3660: Syeddullah. On February 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3661: Rahim. On February 10, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended, by 2 votes to 1, that he should be “transferred to Afghan authorities for their consideration of his prosecution.” Reviewing the decision, a more senior military figure then ordered that he should “continue to be interned at the Justice Center in Parwan (JCIP) and considered for prosecution locally by Afghan prosecutors and judges in the JCIP.”

3662: Gul Rahman. A man with a similar name — Hadji Gul Raman — was released with two other men in December 2009 (although it may not be this particular prisoner, as 3662 was presumably seized in 2008 rather than 2006, but there is no prisoner of this name in the earlier part of the list). According to a report in Le Nouvel Observateur (translated for Truthout), he “spent three years in this dungeon of America-at-war because, like almost all Afghans, he possessed a Kalashnikov … One day in December 2006, Raman left with his uncles to find his cousin, Hadji Ahmed Sharkan, a district governor in Helmand province, kidnapped by traffickers — a national sport in Afghanistan. At a checkpoint, American soldiers searched them. They arrested the one holding the weapon; they ended up releasing the others. Raman never saw either lawyer or judge; it is consequently impossible to verify his version of events … ‘They crossed me off the list of the living,’ he says. ‘I knew neither how long I would remain imprisoned nor where I was.’”

Whether or not this is a description of him (or of someone else), on February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that detainee 3662 should continue to be held. Afterwards, however, a particular Task Force (TALON) presented “a well-delineated plan for [his] reintegration and substantial community support,” which was approved by a more senior military figure.

3663: Abdul Sattar
3664: Abdul Malik

3665: Yacoub (Yakoub). At a Detainee Review Board on September 17, 2009, as I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), it was recommended that he be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution. He appeared to have allegedly been caught in a vehicle loaded with weapons.

3666: Mullah Hakim Noor

3670: Sadik. At a Detainee Review Board on October 15, 2009, as I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), it was recommended that Sadik be released without conditions. It appeared that he had been caught by mistake after US forces were attacked, and after they mistakenly concluded that the attacks had come from his truck, which they then “ruined.”

3672: Hamza
3673: Mohammad Rahamatullah
3674: Zabiullah
3675: Sayed Mansour
3676: Mehraban
3677: Husonullah
3678: Sher Agah
3680: Mullah Abdul Basir
3681: Mira Khan
3684: Naim Khan
3685: Nasratullah

3686: Ghulam Yaya. At a Detainee Review Board on October 15, 2009, as I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), it was recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for participation in a reconciliation program. The allegations against him were unclear, but they seemed to involve his uncle.

3687: Nazar Mohammad. At a Detainee Review Board on November 15, 2009, as I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), it was recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for participation in a reconciliation program. Although he was seized in connection with a firefight and a cache of weapons, it is unclear that he had anything at all to do with it.

3688: Gul Ahmad
3690: Osman

3691: Noor Ahmad. At a Detainee Review Board on November 15, 2009, as I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), it was recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution, in connection with a firefight, and a cache of weapons, referred to in the case of ISN 3687, above.

3698: Shaki
3701: Naqibullah
3704: Farhad
3707: Mohammad Daud
3708: Sayed Rahman

3709: Hazrat Mohammad. On March 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3710: Naim Jan
3711: Abdul Qadir
3712: Mohammad Amin Osmani
3713: Asmattulah Meragan Wardak
3714: Amir Mohammad
3715: Pir Mohammad
3717: Fateh Khan
3718: Hamidullah. See ISN 3658, above.
3719: Sabil Suleyman
3720: Mohammad Nabi Khan
3721: Aminullah
3723: Mohammad Daud
3724: Noor Zaman
3725: Yusuf
3728: Abdul Qayum
3729: Noor Khan
3730: Abdullah Jamsheed
3733: Atiqullah

3735: Hafez Zainullah. On March 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3743: Mullah Mohammad
3744: Haji Kashmir
3747: Eid Mar Khan

3748: Shahbodin. At a Detainee Review Board on October 8, 2009, as I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), it was recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution. From his statements, it seemed that he had been recruited to take part in an attack on coalition forces two and a half years before, but regretted it almost immediately.

3749: Majimuddin Yildaz
3750: Janat Gul
3751: Mir Sahib Jan
3752: Amir Khodaidad
3754: Lal Mohammad
3755: Wazir Khan
3756: Habib Shah
3757: Rai Khan
3758: Abdul Wakil
3760: Eid Wali
3761: Mohammad Raqib
3763: Maulawi Nasir
3764: Shoaib Khan
3765: Khalid Funayis Sayid al-Qahtani
3766: Abd al-Aziz Riaz
3767: Mansour al-Mansour
3770: Mullah Ibrahim

3771: Fazel Rahman (Hajji Nazar Gul). At a Detainee Review Board on June 5, 2010, as I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), his release was recommended. It turned out that he was a shopkeeper, and that the following extraordinary passage was supposed to explain why he had provided “support” for the Taliban — because he had stood by while they robbed him:Overall the DRB assessed that if Fazel Rahman provided any support at all to the Taliban it was most !ikely in the form of him standing by while they took items without payment from the store. The DRB considered this kind of support to be unwilling and under implied threat of violence.”

3772: Gul Mohammad
3773: Hazratullah
3774: Hajji Zahar Shah
3775: Abdul Salim

3776: Gul Haidar (Haider). At a Detainee Review Board on June 9, 2010, as I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), the board members found that he met detention criteria, essentially because his brother was a “known Taliban member,” but recommended that internment was not necessary to mitigate the threat that he posed, and that he should be released without conditions; in other words, although they recommended his release, they indicated that it was legitimate to hold him simply because of his brother’s status.

3777: Mullah Zahir
3778: Haji Khodaidad
3779: Nawar Khan

3782: Nek Marjan. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), at a Detainee Review Board on June 5, 2010, “2 out of 3 board members found that internment was necessary to mitigate the threat posed by Nek Marjan (also identified as Shah Wazir), who was assessed to be ‘a part of or a substantial supporter of insurgent forces opposing Coalition Forces,’ even though, alarmingly, it was also noted, ‘Notwithstanding the majority vote, the evidence was so weak that one board member found no internment criteria.’”
Accused of being a Taliban commander, he said that he was probably betrayed by enemies, who had killed his father.

3783: Ahktar Mohammad
3784: Baitullah
3785: Mohammad Sharif
3787: Qari Rafiullah
3788: Sher Agha
3789: Shah Wali
3791: Shirin Agha

3799: Sultan Shah. He was identified as Nawar Khan in his Detainee Review Board on June 7, 2010, as I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), in which the board members found that he did not meet the criteria for internment, because there was “a lack of credible evidence” against him, and a more senior figure then ordered his release. It appeared that he was a poor farmer, and that he did not own potentially incriminating material found in his compound.

3800 Mohammad Ismael
3801: Mohammad Nasir
3802: Rahmatullah
3804: Mohammad Yousef
3805: Dawar Gul
3806: Amin Shir
3807: Mullah Sharif
3808: Wakil
3809: Iqbal
3810: Mohammad Wali
3811: Rais Khan
3812: Hiadullah
3813: Amanullah
3814: Qari Aminullah
3815: Abdul Samad
3816: Bakht Mohammad
3817: Hanif Shah

3818: Gullistan. According to a revised prisoner list released in October 2010 (PDF), he is a Pakistani, and was seized in Paktika province on July 16, 2009.

3819: Gul Badshah

3820: Bismullah. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on September 24, 2009 that he  should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution. The exact circumstances of his capture were not spelled out, but it was clear that he was seized in connection with explosives held in a compound, although he maintained that he was innocent.

3821: Mohammad Rahim

3822: Abdul Janan. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on September 24, 2009 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution. According to the US authorities, “He supports the Taliban and associated forces” and “was observed fleeing from an IED factory with eight other individuals,” but in a statement, Abdul Janan said, “I teach children and I am innocent.”

3823: Sadullah. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on September 24, 2009 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution, although it was unclear why, as all the allegations were redacted, and all that remained were his assertions that he was seized at his home, and that US forces found nothing incriminating.

3824: Idris. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on September 24, 2009 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution. In hand-written notes on a rare “Unclassified Summary” included with the documentation, it was claimed that he “AttenDeD [sic] a jihad tRaNiNg [sic] camp,” filmed an attack on a vehicle, and participated in an attack. In his defense, he seemed to claim that he had been set up by the Taliban.

3825: Khalilullah. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on September 24, 2009 that he did “not meet the criteria for internment,” and a senior officer approved his release without conditions. The basis of his capture was not officially explained, but in a statement Khalilullah was able to explain, “I am innocent. I have not done anything. I am only a teacher. I have no connections to those groups whatsoever.”

3826: Ahmad
3827: Sanullah
3828: Mohibullah

3829: Bakhtyar. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on September 24, 2009 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution. Although the allegations against him were not spelled out, it was clear that they involved claims that he was involved in some sort of insurgent movement because he had transported weapons, although he claimed that he did it for money (and wasn’t even paid).

3830: Rohullah
3831: Mullah Heidar
3832: Jawid Eqval
3833: Ghafoor
3834: Bakhteh Mohammad
3835: Rashid Noor
3836: Boorhomadin
3837: Fazal Ahad
3838: Mohammadullah

3839: Mohammad Azim. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on October 1, 2009 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution, on the basis of voter fraud and some other charge that was redacted, although he maintained that he was innocent, and was actually working for the government.

3840: Wali
3841: Rohullah
3842: Musa Khan
3843: Abdul Mohammad
3844: Naimullah

3845: Sher Agha. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), his name was actually Dil Awar, and although it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on June 5, 2010 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for rehabilitation, a more senior figure ordered his release instead. He was captured during a raid on a compound, but he had only been visiting at the time and was clearly not the owner of any of the supposedly incriminating material seized during the raid. His DRB was also noticeable because witnesses were called in his defense.

3847: Badshah Khel

3848: Laek Shah. According to a revised prisoner list released in October 2010 (PDF), he was seized in Khost on November 11, 2008.

3849: Sadiqullah
3850: Ezat Shah
3851: Rahim Kham
3852: Mohammad Nasim

3853: Khanullah. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3854: Qari Asil Hassan
3856: Mohammadullah
3857: Masoom Khan
3859: Abdul Halim
3860: Abdul Hanan
3861: Rozee Khan

3862: Abdul Aziz. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3863: Maulawi Nazim
3865: Haji Abdul Zahar
3866: Basirullah
3867: Juma Guhl Khan
3868: Maulawi Salim
3869: Gul Agha
3870: Ziauddin
3871: Omar Sadiq
3872: Kaifayatullah
3874: Hiatullah
3876: Qari Ahmadullah

3877: Shamsuddin Ul-Rahman. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on September 24, 2009 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution. What he was alleged to have done was not made clear, although it seemed to involve a claim that he was involved in distributing threatening “night letters” from the Taliban to people in his village, and also that his name was mentioned on a Taliban radio transmission, although he insisted that he was innocent.

3881: Hamidullah. See ISN 3658, above.
3882: Taj Mohammad

3883: Mullah Ismael. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3884: Bilal. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3885: Abas Khan. On February 9, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3886: Janat Khan. On February 9, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended, by 2 votes to 1, that, although he met the criteria for internment, he should be transferred for reconciliation — which, presumably, meant that the board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3887: Zia Rahman
3888: Tahlimin
3891: Iman Gul
3893: Gul Salam
3894: Hakim Jan

3895: Qasim Khan. On February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for criminal prosecution.

3896: Shahkarin. On February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3897: Omar Khan
3898: Mohammad Rahman

3899: Haji Abdul Aziz. According to a revised prisoner list released in October 2010 (PDF), he was seized in Nangarhar province on December 15, 2008.

3900: Abdul Rahman. According to a revised prisoner list released in October 2010 (PDF), he was seized in Nangarhar province on December 15, 2008.

3901: Abdul Wahid. According to a revised prisoner list released in October 2010 (PDF), he was seized in Nangarhar province on December 17, 2008.

3906: Sayed Qalam. On February 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3907: Said Alim
3908: Zia Ul-Haq
3909: Naqib Ahmad
3910: Hidayatullah

3911: Qandi Agha. On January 29, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended his release and reintegration.

3912: Totee Agha
3913: Kaiser Duhr
3914: Mohammed Ibrahim
3915: Sayed Din Mohammad
3917: Mir Salam Khan

3918: Abdullah Jan. On March 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3919: Adil. On March 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3920: Mohammad Ayoub. On March 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3921: Tawiz Khan
3922: Haji Khiawa Jan
3923: Qasim

3924: Zarin Gul. On March 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that, although he met detention criteria, internment was not necessary to mitigate the threat that he posed, and he should be released.

3925: Miram Jan

3926: Saleh Bad Shah. On March 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — for participation in the rehabilitation program.

3927: Mobarak Khan. On March 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3928: Alludeen. On March 20, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — “for consideration of prosecution or participation in the rehabilitation program.”

3929: Abdul Jalal. On March 30, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — for “consideration of prosecution or participation in the rehabilitation program.”

3930: Haji Abdul Baqi

3932: Bahram Jan. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on October 1, 2009 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution. Although the allegations against him were not made clear, it was apparent that they involved a claim that he was involved in handling materials to be used in an IED attack, although he refuted the claim, stating that he was a flower seller with mental health problems.

3933: Noor Wali
3934: Sahar Gul
3935: Sultan Ali
3936: Noor Ali
3937: Abgul Ghafour

3938: Abdullah. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on October 1, 2009 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution. The allegations against him were not spelled out, but involved a claim that he had been involved with explosives, although he denied it.

3939: Noor Alam. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on October 1, 2009 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution. As usual, the allegations were not spelled out, although a heavily redacted “Unclassified Summary” included the words, “cell member.” In his defense, he stated, “I am a land owner and a carpenter. I know nothing of politics. I was caught by Taliban and they said that the infidels were coming and then they left me in the car and I was caught by US forces.”

3940: Abdul Zatar
3941: Haji Musa Kalim
3943: Hekmatullah
3944: Barakatullah
3945: Salim
3947: Ahmad Noor
3948: Khiali Gul
3949: Janan
3950: Eid Mohammad
3951: Mustafa al-Madani

3952: Taj Gul. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on October 15, 2009 that he did “not meet the criteria for internment,” and a senior officer approved his release without conditions. Unfortunately, the redactions in the document mean that there is no clue as to what he was alleged to have done, although he was clearly a very poor farmer. He also noted that he had been abused by US soldiers at the time of his capture.

3953: Mohammad Akbar
3954: Shamsul Rahman
3955: Baz Gul
3956: Gholam Nabi
3958: Chinar Gul
3959: Munib
3960: Abdul Wahab

3961: Raz Mohammad. On March 20, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

3962: Qari Israel
3965: Jahan Gir
3966: Khanai Mohammad
3967: Jawal Shah
3968: Mullah Abdul Raouf
3969: Abdul Ahad
3970: Zarin Gul
3971: Haji Nazair Mohammad
3972: Haji Abdul Ghani
3973: Muhammed
3974: Qari Azizullah
3976: Safir
3977: Abdul Nafi

3978: Haji Katlai. On February 15, 2010, the Brigade Surgeon issued a Recommendation for Consideration for Medical Humanitarian Release for 67-year old Haji Katlai, suggesting that “continued detention may place him at risk,” because he has “a constellation of medical problems including diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and history of stroke.” He was captured by US-assisted Afghan forces in March 2009 on a raid in Pul-e-Alam District, Logar Province, Reports indicated that he was “a well known insurgent and influential business man in the Logar and Kabul Provinces,” who allegedly “provided financial support for the insurgency” and “use[d] his hotel to support suicide bombing operations.”After noting that a DRB in November 2009 had recommended his continued detention, a more senior military figure wrote, “After consideration, and consistent with the Brigade Surgeon’s recommendation, I recommend [his] humanitarian release. Nearly all reporting predates his illness and is from between 2005 – 2008. The assessment that he is a continuing threat is mitigated by his age and deteriorating health.”

3980: Mikhail Ibrahim Barbur
3981: Sayeed Amin
3982: Hajji Kheyl Mohammad
3983: Shafiq Rahman
3984: Lahur Gul
3985: Murad Khan
3986: Saheb Rahman
3987: Sur Gul
3988: Bismullah
3989: Alam Gul

3990: Abdul Samad. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on June 9, 2010 that he should continue to be held at Parwan. From the information presented, it was obvious that he was seized in a compound in which there was a large amount of material that US forces thought significant, although he claimed that he had no knowledge of any of it, except his school books. “There were four of us detained, my two uncles and one cousin,” he said, adding, “I am an honest person. These things that you have read to me I do not have. The only things that are mine are my store [school?] books. I am a student and I am not involved with IEDs at all.”

3991: Abdul Haq
3994: Haji Gul Hakim

3995: Hajji Agha Jan. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on SJune 7, 2010 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for participation in a reconciliation or reintegration program. He was seized in a house raid, and US forces alleged that he had incriminating material on a computer, but it was apparent that there had been a grave failure of intelligence, as Hajji Agha Jan was a very prominent landowner who spoke eloquently in his defense, and also called witnesses to testify on his behalf.

3997: Ajmal Shamsher. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on June 9, 2010 that he “not meet the criteria for internment,” and a senior officer approved his release without conditions. In the documentation, it was stated that he had been seized on April 22, 2009, but the exact allegations against him were not spelled out. However, he told the board, “I have a land dispute with a guy and he is the one who made the false report.”

3998: Neyamat Gul
3999: Allah Noor
4000: Naqibullah
4001: Khan Dan
4004: Ibrahim Ahmedkhan
4005: Abdullah
4006: Sharif Noor
4007: Sher Hassan
4008: Sefatullah
4009: Baktullah
4011: Saidullah
4013: Wali
4014: Abdullah Kuchi
4016: Matiullah
4017: Abdul Rahman
4018: Rahmat
4019: Munawar Khan
4020: Painda Gul
4021: Adam Jan Popalzai
4022: Abdullah
4023: Rouzi Mohammad
4024: Saleh Mohammad
4025: Ghazi Marjan
4026: Mohammad Hashim
4027: Said Agha
4028: Shamal
4029: Zirat Gul
4030: Abdul Basir
4031: Mullah Bashir
4032: Wakil
4033: Haqmal Saifi
4034: Mohammad Sadiq

4035: Jamaluddin. On January 20, 2010, a Detainee Review Board found that, although he met detention criteria, internment was not necessary to mitigate the threat that he posed, and recommended that he should be released.

4036: Atiquallh

4037: Atiqullah. On January 20, 2010, a Detainee Review Board found that he should continue to be held.

4038: Gulab Shah
4039: Qari Nazar
4040: Abu Bakar
4041: Mohammad Yusef
4042: Musa Khan
4043: Wantan Jan

4044: Mohammad Na’imi. On February 9, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended, by 2 votes to 1, that he should be “transferred to Afghan authorities for their consideration of his prosecution.” Reviewing the decision, a more senior military figure then ordered that he should “continue to be interned at the Justice Center in Parwan (JCIP) and considered for prosecution locally by Afghan prosecutors and judges in the JCIP.”

4045: Mohammad Yunus. On February 9, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

4046: Sayid Muhammad
4047: Safiullah
4048: Abdul Karim
4051: Ahmedullah

4052: Mirza Khan. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4054: Hirullah. On February 9, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for criminal prosecution.

4056: Sayed Anwar. On February 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be “transferred to Afghan authorities for their consideration of his prosecution.” Reviewing the decision, a more senior military figure then ordered that he should “continue to be interned at the Justice Center in Parwan (JCIP) and considered for prosecution locally by Afghan prosecutors and judges in the JCIP.”

4057: Said Jamaluddin. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended his transfer to a third country “for possible prosecution or continued detention in accordance with that nation’s laws.”

4058: Abdul Fatah. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended his transfer to a third country “for possible prosecution or continued detention in accordance with that nation’s laws.”

4059: Mohammad Kasim. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

4060: Khan Wali. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4061: Akbar Jan. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4062: Said Anwar. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4063: Abdul Kareem

4064: Mullah Jalani. On February 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4065: Maulawi Qabil. A man of this name was detained in June 2009. According to a report in September 2009, “Maulawi Qabil, a Salafist commander in Konar province was captured June 13. Qabil led multiple attacks against coalition and ANSF forces and transported IEDs within the province.”

On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program. However, a more senior military figure chose to override this recommendation, concluding that he should still be held.

4066: Mohammad Osman. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4067: Hafizullah

4068: Gholam Sakhi. On February 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4069: Ajmal Khan. On February 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

4070: Lambat. On February 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

4071: Fazal Rahim. On February 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4072: Noorullah. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

4073: Abdul Qayum
4074: Khan Wali
4075: Jumadin
4076: Mullah Mutalib
4077: Abdul Rahim
4078: Edullah

4079: Ayoub Shah. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4080: Shah Mohammad

4081: Sadiqullah. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4082: Mohammad Tahir
4083: Shafiullah
4084: Mohammad Agul
4085: Abdul Alim
4086: Abdul Muktar
4087: Mohammad Ghows
4088: Abdul Habib
4089: Sayed Ahmad
4090: Noor Ahmad
4091: Mohammad Karim
4092: Ahmadullah
4093: Juma Jan
4094: Faiz Mohammad
4095: Abdul Raziq
4096: Mohammad Nawabe

4097: Salim. On March 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4098: Hokuran. On March 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4099: Saifullah. On March 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that, although he met detention criteria, internment was not necessary to mitigate the threat that he posed, and he should be released.

4100: Sar Gul. On March 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4101: Bakhtyar Gul

4102: Abdul Ghazni. On March 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4103: Mir Weis. On March 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that, although he met detention criteria, internment was not necessary to mitigate the threat that he posed, and he should be released.

4104: Qari Adel. On March 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — “for consideration of prosecution or participation in a rehabilitation program.”

4105: Awaldeen. On March 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4106: Sali Mohammad. On March 20, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4107: Lal Mar Jan. On March 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities “for consideration of criminal prosecution,” but a more senior military figure directed that he should continue to be detained.

4108: Gul Mohammad
4109: Abdul Hadi

4110: Mahmoud. On March 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.” In his panel, two out of three members of the board found internment necessary to mitigate the threat he posed.

4111: Asil Khan Sultan Khan. On March 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

4112: Rahmat Wali. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on September 17, 2009 that he should be transferred to the Afghan authorities for criminal prosecution. In a rare “Unclassified Summary” included with the documentation, it was stated that he “was captured [redacted] weapons network and its commander,” but there were no further clues as to what he was accused of. He reportedly “stated that he is glad that the Americans came because now we have good schools for his children,” adding that “he had never been involved with the Taliban.”

4113: Pasta Khan. This may be Masta Khan, who, according to a report in September 2009, is “a foreign fighter and weapons facilitator as well as IED emplacer in Terzayi district, Khost province who was captured July 9.”

On March 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that detainee 4113 should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4114: Mujahed. On March 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4115: Fazil Rahman
4116: Zakariya
4117: Mohammad Qasim
4118: Musa
4119: Abdul Rahman
4120: Mullah Hamadullah
4121: Abdul Malik

4122: Abdul Ghani. As I explained in Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part Two of Three), it was recommended at his Detainee Review Board on October 8, 2009 that he did “not meet the criteria for internment,” and a senior officer approved his release without conditions. He was evidently a teacher, and had been seized for no reason on the way to a wedding.

4123: Abdullah Jan
4124: Bakhty Gul Turav

4125: Mullah Karim. A man of this name was detained in August 2009. According to a CJTF-82 press release in November 2009, “Mullah Karim was detained Aug. 5. Karim facilitated logistics and safe havens for Taliban commanders in Andar district, Ghazni province.  He is responsible for IED and direct attacks against Afghan and coalition forces.”

4126: Mullah Naim
4127: Hajji Wahed
4128: Shamsaullah
4129: Ezatullah
4130: Esmatullah
4131: Naimat Yamatullah
4132: Mohammed Sultan
4133: Janan

4134: Ali Gul. On March 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat,” because internment was necessary to mitigate the threat he posed.

4135: Saidullah
4136: Rahmatullah
4137: Zalmai
4138: Abdul Wasay
4139: Abdul Karim
4140: Mullah Said Ahmad
4141: Mohammad Yaqoub
4142: Rahmatullah
4143: Mohammad Aslam
4144: Ghulam Mohammad
4145: Mohammad Nabi
4146: Toor Jan
4147: Nasr Aldin
4148: Ahbul Bari
4149: Shir Mohammad
4150: Abdul Manan
4151: Niaz Mohammad
4152: Khani Lun
4153: Haji Maulawi Agha
4154: Rafiq
4155: Noor Sayed Ahmad
4156: Muhammad Elyas
4157: Mir Wais
4158: Hawatullah
4159: Hedayatullah
4160: Abdul Ahad
4161: Rahim Dad
4162: Sayed Mohammad
4163: Sardar Wali
4164: Mohammad Rahim
4165: Mullah Bashir
4166: Mohammed
4167: Nawab Khan
4168: Sakhi Jan

4169: Alam Khan Shah Mahamoud. In February 2010, in an article in Le Nouvel Observateur (translated for Truthout), the father of a prisoner named Alam Khan, described as “a young peasant,” explained how his son was seized: “One day, in Zabul province, our neighbor Nasrallah shot my son, whose land he coveted, twice. During his convalescence, my son swore to take revenge. But before he could do so, Nasrallah had denounced him to the Americans to protect himself. He claimed that my son was a Taliban commandant, a certain Salim. Yet everybody knows that this Salim is not even from our district!”

The following numbering system is not explained, although it may be a new system, just introduced:

20001: Mir Wali Khan
20002: Zarghun

20003: Rahmatullah. On March 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20004: Maroof. On March 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20005: Adel Gul
20006: Hasan Khan
20008: Abdul Hadi
20009: Abdul Rahman
20010: Hayat Khan
20011: Haji Hanbali
20012: Mohammad Hamza
20013: Lal Jan
20014: Mohammad Hashim
20015: Mohammad Fazil
20016: Daud Agha
20017: Abdul Rahim
20019: Abdul Ghafur
20021: Abdul Satar

20022: Mohammad Dawood. A man of this name was detained in September 2009. According to a report , “Mohammad Dawood, a Taliban commander in Gelan district, Ghazni province was detained Sept. 1.”

20023: Mahmood

New prisoners added after the list above was compiled in September 2009, and the decisions taken by Detainee review Boards regarding their disposition

Note: All these prisoners were captured after September 2009. With two exceptions, none of them are named, and all but one are from Set 1 of the “Commander’s Final Decision Memos,” mentioned above.

1231 (not listed in September 2009, therefore is probably an old prisoner captured again). On March 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

3151: Abdul Rahman Jan. In Voices from Bagram: Prisoners Speak in Their Detainee Review Boards (Part One of Three), I explained that Jan, who had the number 3151 because he had been held in Bagram once before, in 2007, was recommended for release by a Detainee Review Board on June 7, 2010, which concluded that he was only held because of faulty intelligence.

4207: Noor Agha. On March 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

4213. On March 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

4241. On January 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

4243. On January 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

4244. On January 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

4245. On January 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

4259. On January 20, 2010, a Detainee Review Baord recommended that he should continue to be held. On February 18, a more senior military figure, reviewing this decision, recommended that he should be released into a reintegration and reconciliation program.

4262. On January 21, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

4264. On March 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4265. On January 21, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

4266. On January 20, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that, although he met detention criteria, internment was not necessary to mitigate the threat that he posed, and he should be released into a reintegration and reconciliation program.

4271. On January 30, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4273. On January 30, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

4274. On February 6, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

4276. On February 9, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4277. On February 9, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4279. On February 10, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

4280. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for criminal prosecution.

4282. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for criminal prosecution.

4283. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for criminal prosecution.

4284. On February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — for participation in the rehabilitation program.

4285. On February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4286. On February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4287. On February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4288. On February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4291. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

4293. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4294. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4295. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4296. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4297. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

4299. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4306. On March 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — for participation in the rehabilitation program.

4312. On March 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities for “consideration of criminal prosecution,” but a more senior military figure directed that he should continue to be detained.

4313. On March 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

4314. On March 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he “did not meet the criteria for internment” and should be released.

4316. On March 22, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4317. On March 22, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4318. On March 22, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

4319. On March 22, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20048. On January 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

20058. On January 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released without conditions.

20067. On January 28, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

20068. On January 28, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

20069. On January 28, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

20070. On January 30, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20072. On January 28, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

20073. On January 28, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

20076. On January 30, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20090. On February 9, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul, for participation in the rehabilitation program.

20092. On February 10, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20094. On February 10, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

20095. On February 10, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20096. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be released.

20097. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20098. On February 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — for participation in the rehabilitation program.

20099. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20102. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20103. On February 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20104. On February 11, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be “transferred to Afghan authorities for their consideration of his prosecution.” Reviewing the decision, a more senior military figure then ordered that he should “continue to be interned at the Justice Center in Parwan (JCIP) and considered for prosecution locally by Afghan prosecutors and judges in the JCIP.”

20105. On February 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20106. On February 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20107. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20109. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20110. On February 17, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20111. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20112. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20113. On February 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20114. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20115. On February 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20131. On March 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20133. On March 13, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20134. On March 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20135. On March 20, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20136. On March 20, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20137. On March 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20138. On March 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20139. On March 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should be transferred to Afghan custody — presumably the Afghan National Detention Facility (ANDF) at Pol-i-Charki prison, Kabul — for participation in the rehabilitation program.

20140. On March 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20141. On March 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20142. On March 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20143. On March 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20144. On March 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities for “consideration of criminal prosecution,” but a more senior military figure directed that he should continue to be detained.

20145. On March 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20146. On March 20, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20147. On March 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20148. On March 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities, but a more senior military figure directed that he should continue to be detained.

20149: On March 16, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities, but a more senior military figure directed that he should continue to be detained.

20150. On March 18, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities for “consideration to participate in a reconciliation or a rehabilitation program,” but a more senior military figure directed that he should continue to be detained.

20152. On March 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20153. On March 24, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities, but a more senior military figure directed that he should continue to be detained.

20154. On March 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities, but a more senior military figure directed that he should continue to be detained.

20159. On March 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities, but a more senior military figure directed that he should continue to be detained.

20162. On March 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he should continue to be held, even though he was not assessed as an “Enduring Security Threat.”

20163. On March 25, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended him for transfer to the Afghan authorities, but a more senior military figure directed that he should continue to be detained.

20169. On March 23, 2010, a Detainee Review Board recommended that he met detention criteria, but that internment was not necessary to mitigate the threat that he posed. However, a more senior military figure decided that he should continue to be held in Parwan.

Andy Worthington is the author of The Guantánamo Files: The Stories of the 774 Detainees in America’s Illegal Prison (published by Pluto Press, distributed by Macmillan in the US, and available from Amazon — click on the following for the US and the UK). To receive new articles in your inbox, please subscribe to my RSS feed (and I can also be found on Facebook and Twitter). Also see my definitive Guantánamo prisoner list, updated in January 2010, details about the new documentary film, “Outside the Law: Stories from Guantánamo” (co-directed by Polly Nash and Andy Worthington, and launched in October 2009), and, if you appreciate my work, feel free to make a donation.

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Andy Worthington

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