Photos of Poplar Dock, Canary Wharf and Greenwich on the Eve of the Olympics

Poplar Dock MarinaA tug in Poplar Dock MarinaCranes in Poplar Dock MarinaPoplar Dock Marina and New Providence WharfCanary Wharf from Preston's Road, BlackwallCanary Wharf from Blackwall Basin
An Olympic cruise ship in West India DocksThe Isle of Dogs Pumping StationSoldiers in GreenwichOlympic bridges, GreenwichGreenwich Naval College and the cruise shipGreenwich Olympic stadium
The Queen's House during the OlympicsGreenwich and the Olympic traffic barriers

Poplar Dock, Canary Wharf and Greenwich on the Eve of the Olympics, a set on Flickr.

This photo set is the 82nd in my ongoing project to photograph the whole of London by bike, which I began last May, and is the last of five sets taken on July 25 last year, a wonderful sunny day two days before the Olympic Games began, when I cycled east from Whitechapel along the A11 — Mile End Road, which becomes Bow Road and crosses the A12 on the way to the Olympic Park along Stratford High Street. I then cycled around the perimeter of the Olympic Park, up to Leyton on the eastern side, then along the A12 at the north, and then back south via Hackney Wick and Old Ford on the east, then through Bow, Bromley-by-Bow, Poplar and the Isle of Dogs, stopping in on Greenwich before returning home to Brockley.

The first two sets recording this journey were “Adventures in History: The Mile End Road,” and “From Mile End to Bow and Stratford on a Summer’s Day,” canned the third set — “The Olympics Minus One Day: Photos from the Frontline in Stratford” (and see here too) — was published last July, to capture some of the Olympic fervour at the time — even though I was extremely cynical about the outrageous and unaudited cost of the Olympics and the hideous patriotism milked by the government to deflect attention from its own evil heart, and even though I almost always prefer the fruits of cooperation to the chest-thumping Darwinism of competitive sport. Read the rest of this entry »

East End Odyssey: Photos of a Journey from Leyton to Poplar

The transformation of High Road LeytonHigh Road Leyton's colourful makeoverThe Hertford Union Canal, near the Olympic ParkThe wreck on Wick LaneWall of doorsBroken
The car wash and the Olympic ParkThe Bow BellsLimehouse Cut from Violet RoadFootbridge, Bromley-by-BowSpratt's Patent LimitedRoyal Charlie
Chrisp Street MarketChrisp Street Market clock towerPoplar Public BathsA wonderful mural in Poplar Public BathsArt in Poplar Public BathsInside Poplar Public Baths
Poplar Public Baths: the foyer and staircasePoplar Public Baths: the foyer and doors

East End Odyssey: A Journey from Leyton to Poplar, a set on Flickr.

This photo set is the 81st in my ongoing project to photograph the whole of London by bike, which I began last May, and is the third of four sets which either precede or follow on from a set I published last July, entitled, “The Olympics Minus One Day: Photos from the Frontline in Stratford” (and see here too), in which I cycled east from Whitechapel along the A11 — Mile End Road, which becomes Bow Road and crosses the A12 on the way to the Olympic Park along Stratford High Street. In the Olympics set I published in July, I then cycled up to Leyton, along the A12 at the north of the Olympic Park, and then back south via Hackney Wick, Old Ford, Poplar and the Isle of Dogs, stopping in on Greenwich before returning home to Brockley.

The previous two sets, “Adventures in History: The Mile End Road,” and “From Mile End to Bow and Stratford on a Summer’s Day,” covered the first part of this journey, right up to my first glimpse of the Olympic Park from the Bow Flyover. This set largely picks up where the Olympics set left off, although it includes a few photos not specifically related to the Olympics, which I took in Leyton and Hackney Wick and Old Ford, while making my way around the perimeter of the Olympic Park. Read the rest of this entry »

Photos of a Journey Across the Thames on the Olympics Cable Car

Approaching the Royal DocksPeninsula Central - and the car parkCanary Wharf - from the Peninsula car parkTake-off on the Emirates Air LineLooking back at the Olympics cable car terminalAlong the river from the Olympics cable car
The Dome and Canary Wharf from the skyThe River Lea from the Emirates Air LineThe River Lea and the Olympic ParkThe Thames - still a working riverThe Dome and Canary Wharf from the eastThe Olympics cable car prepares to land
Looking south from the Olympics cable carLooking north west along the railwayLooking west along the Lower Lea CrossingThe Royal Docks from the skyComing in to land on the Emirates Air LineThe O2 from the Lower Lea Crossing
The East India Dock BasinThe O2 from the East India Dock Basin

A Journey Across the Thames on the Olympics Cable Car, a set on Flickr.

On August 6, as I explained in a previous article, Jamaican Independence and a Giant Tent: Photos of a Visit to the Olympic Site at the O2, featuring photos and commentary, I cycled along the river from Deptford to Greenwich peninsula with my wife and son, to visit the O2 (recorded in that previous set of photos), and also to travel on the Emirates Air Line, the cable cars across the Thames, which run from North Greenwich, near the O2 (formerly the Millennium Dome) to the Royal Docks. The visit was for fun, but was also part of my ongoing project to photograph the whole of London by bike, which I have been recording here since June.

Intended to transport Olympics visitors from one venue to another, the Emirates Air Line project — named after the Emirates airline company, the biggest sponsor of the cable cars, who provided £36 million in a ten-year sponsorship deal — also provides a useful way of crossing the river at a point where there are few other options — just the Greenwich Foot Tunnel to the west, and the Woolwich Ferry to the east — and it is both remarkable and commendable that bicycles are also allowed. Read the rest of this entry »

My Photos on Flickr: The Isle of Dogs, the River Lea and the Olympics

North Greenwich shore and skyThe Millennium Dome (O2)Beach and tower, Isle of DogsEstate facade, Isle of DogsIsle of Dogs tower blockDocklands on the river
Old and new, Isle of DogsCanary Wharf (1)Canary Wharf (2)The Gun pub, Isle of DogsGrass houseOlympic delivery
The Dome from Orchard PlaceOrchard Place, PoplarStreet art, Orchard Place, PoplarCrazy cartoon fishFlying fishNeither here nor there
Trinity Buoy WharfFatboy's Diner and the Thames lightshipMore workspace innovationThe River LeaEast London skyThe Olympic cable cars

The Isle of Dogs, the River Lea and the Olympics, a set on Flickr.

Regular readers will know that, after the rainiest spring in living memory, I found myself unable to stay in the house when the sun started shining again. My mission to take advantage of the good weather, and to take exercise and stretch my eyes and my mind beyond what I was beginning to regard as the confines of my computer, has resulted, over the last few months, in numerous journeys around London by bike. With my camera close at hand, the intention of these journeys has generally had less to do with getting from A to B than with wandering, getting lost and exploring.

I recently set up a Flickr account, initially posting photos of my trip to the US in January to campaign for the closure of Guantánamo, and of other protests in the UK, but this week I also began posting photos from my London journeys, beginning with a set of photos of my initial cycle journey around Deptford and Greenwich, and continuing here. Others will follow soon.

I am, I think, fulfilling a long dormant need to be in motion physically rather than constantly undertaking the mental journeys of the last five years of my life as a full-time freelance investigative journalist, and I am also at the beginning of a long project to travel — and photograph — the whole of London by bike. I have discovered that, as well as looking for spectacular views of the city that has been my home for 27 years, including many that I have never seen before, I am also in search of forgotten corners, and images of decay, often set against those of what is often termed “regeneration,” as well as the explosions of dissent and nonconformity and colour that are to be found in London’s street art. Read the rest of this entry »

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Andy Worthington

Investigative journalist, author, campaigner, commentator and public speaker. Recognized as an authority on Guantánamo and the “war on terror.” Co-founder, Close Guantánamo, co-director, We Stand With Shaker. Also, singer and songwriter (The Four Fathers) and photographer (The State of London).
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