Archive for April, 2018

Ali Al-Marri, Held and Tortured on US Soil, Accuses FBI Agents of Involvement in His Torture

A previously unseen screenshot of Ali al-Marri during his imprisonment without charge or trial and his torture in the US naval brig in Charleston.Please support my work as a reader-funded journalist! I’m currently trying to raise $2500 (£2000) to support my writing and campaigning on Guantánamo and related issues over the next three months of the Trump administration.

 

I wrote the following article for the “Close Guantánamo” website, which I established in January 2012, on the 10th anniversary of the opening of Guantánamo, with the US attorney Tom Wilner. Please join us — just an email address is required to be counted amongst those opposed to the ongoing existence of Guantánamo, and to receive updates of our activities by email.

On Thursday April 26, in Amsterdam, Ali al-Marri, one of only three men held and tortured as an “enemy combatant” on the US mainland in the wake of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, spoke for the first time publicly, since his release in 2015, about his long ordeal in US custody, and launched a report about his imprisonment as an “enemy combatant,” implicating several FBI agents and stating that he is an innocent man, who only pleaded guilty to providing material support to terrorism in May 2009 because he could see no other way to be released and reunited with his family in Qatar.

Primarily through a case analysis of 35,000 pages of official US documents, secured through Freedom of Information legislation, al-Marri, supported by the British NGO CAGE and his long-standing US lawyer, Andy Savage, accuses several named FBI agents, and other US government representatives, of specific involvement in his torture. The generally-accepted narrative regarding US torture post-9/11 is that it was undertaken by the CIA (and, at Guantánamo, largely by military contractors), while the FBI refused to be engaged in it. Al-Marri, however, alleges that FBI agents Ali Soufan and Nicholas Zambeck, Department of Defense interrogator Lt. Col. Jose Ramos, someone called Russell Lawson, regarded as having had “a senior role in managing [his] torture,” and two others, Jacqualine McGuire and I. Kalous, were implicated in his torture.

Al-Marri’s story is well-known to those who have studied closely the US’s various aberrations from the norms of detention and prisoner treatment in the wake of the 9/11 attacks — at Guantánamo, in CIA-run “black sites,” in proxy prisons run by other governments’ security services, and, for al-Marri, and the US citizens Jose Padilla and Yasser Hamdi, on US soil — but it is a sad truth that the majority of Americans have not heard of him. Read the rest of this entry »

Lawyers for Guantánamo Torture Victim Mohammed Al-Qahtani Urge Court to Enable Mental Health Assessment and Possible Repatriation to Saudi Arabia

Mohammed al-Qahtani, in a photo included in the classified military files released by WikiLeaks in 2011. Please support my work as a reader-funded journalist! I’m currently trying to raise $2500 (£2000) to support my writing and campaigning on Guantánamo and related issues over the next three months of the Trump administration.

 

Last Thursday, lawyers for Mohammed al-Qahtani, the only prisoner at Guantánamo whose torture was admitted by a senior official in the George W. Bush administration, urged Judge Rosemary Collyer of the District Court in Washington, D.C. to order the government “to ask for his current condition to be formally examined by a mixed medical commission, a group of neutral doctors intended to evaluate prisoners of war for repatriation,” as Murtaza Hussain reported for the Intercept. He added that the commission “could potentially order the government to release him from custody and return him home to Saudi Arabia, based on their evaluation of his mental and physical state.”

A horrendous torture program, approved by defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld, was developed for al-Qahtani after it was discovered that he was apparently intended to have been the 20th hijacker for the 9/11 attacks. As Hussain stated, court documents from his case state that he was subject to “solitary confinement, sleep deprivation, extreme temperature and noise exposure, stress positions, forced nudity, body cavity searches, sexual assault and humiliation, beatings, strangling, threats of rendition, and water-boarding.” On two occasions he was hospitalized with a dangerously low heart rate. The log of that torture is here, and as Hussain also explained, “The torture that Qahtani experienced at Guantánamo also exacerbated serious pre-existing mental illnesses that he suffered as a youth in Saudi Arabia — conditions so severe that he was committed to a mental health facility there in 2000, at the age of 21.”

The high-level acknowledgement of al-Qahtani’s torture, mentioned above, came just before George W. Bush left office, when Susan Crawford, the convening authority for the military commission trial system at Guantánamo, told Bob Woodward, “We tortured Qahtani. His treatment met the legal definition of torture.” She was explaining why she had refused to refer his case for prosecution. Read the rest of this entry »

As Two Former Guantánamo Prisoners Disappear in Libya After Repatriation from Asylum in Senegal, There Are Fears for 150 Others Resettled in Third Countries

Omar Khalifa Mohammed Abu Bakr (aka Omar Mohammed Khalifh) and Salem Gherebi (aka Ghereby), Libyans resettled in Senegal in April 2016, who are now threatened with being sent back to Libya, which is not safe for them. The photos are from the classified military files released by WikiLeaks in 2011.

Please support my work as a reader-funded journalist! I’m currently trying to raise $2500 (£2000) to support my writing and campaigning on Guantánamo and related issues over the next three months of the Trump administration.

 

Congratulations to the New York Times for not giving up on the story of the two former Guantánamo prisoners who were recently repatriated to Libya despite having been given humanitarian asylum in Senegal two years ago, on the understanding that they would not be sent back to Libya, as it was unsafe for them. The story is particularly significant from a US perspective, because of the role played — or not played — by the State Department, which, under President Obama, facilitated the resettlement of the men, and many others, and, in general, also kept an eye on them after their release.

The story first emerged three weeks ago, when I was told about it by former prisoner Omar Deghayes, and the Intercept published an article. My article is here. A week later, the New York Times picked up on the story, reporting, as Omar Deghayes also confirmed to me, that one of the two men, Salem Ghereby (aka Gherebi) had voluntarily returned to Libya, as he desperately wanted to be united with his wife and children, and because he hoped that his connections in the country would prevent him from coming to any harm. My second article is here.

Unfortunately, on his return, Salem Ghereby was imprisoned at Tripoli’s Mitiga Airport, where human rights abuses have been widely reported, and the British NGO CAGE then reported that the other Libyan, Omar Khalifa Mohammed Abu Bakr (aka Omar Mohammed Khalifh), who didn’t want to be repatriated, had also been sent back to Libya, where he too was imprisoned at the airport. I wrote about that here, and then exclusively published Salem Gherebi’s letter explaining why he had chosen to be repatriated. Read the rest of this entry »

The 34 Estates Approved for Destruction By Sadiq Khan Despite Promising No More Demolitions Without Residents’ Ballots

The destruction of Robin Hood Gardens estate in Poplar, March 13, 2018 (Photo: Andy Worthington).Please support my work as a reader-funded investigative journalist, commentator and activist.

 

Anyone paying any attention to the sordid story of council estate demolitions in London will know how hard it is to take politicians seriously — and especially Labour politicians — when it comes to telling the truth about their actions and their intentions.

Perfectly sound estates are deliberately run down, so that councils can then claim that it’s too expensive to refurbish them, and that the only option is to knock them down and build new ones — with their developer friends who are conveniently waiting in the wings.

In addition, a collection of further lies are also disseminated, which divert attention from the fundamental injustice of the alleged justification for demolitions — false claims that the new housing will be “affordable”, when it isn’t; that part-ownership deals are worthwhile, when they are not; and that building new properties with private developers will reduce council waiting lists, when it won’t. Read the rest of this entry »

Ex-Guantánamo Prisoner Discusses Prison Artwork with the BBC, While Lawyers for “High-Value Detainee” Demand His Right to Continue Making Art

Untitled (aka Crying eye) by Mohammed al-Ansi, who was released from Guantanamo to Oman in January 2017, just before President Obama left office (Photo: Andy Worthington).Please support my work as a reader-funded journalist! I’m currently trying to raise $2500 (£2000) to support my writing and campaigning on Guantánamo and related issues over the next three months of the Trump administration.

 

I wrote the following article for the “Close Guantánamo” website, which I established in January 2012, on the 10th anniversary of the opening of Guantánamo, with the US attorney Tom Wilner. Please join us — just an email address is required to be counted amongst those opposed to the ongoing existence of Guantánamo, and to receive updates of our activities by email.

Last October, an exhibition opened in the President’s Gallery, in John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, that might have attracted little attention had the Pentagon not decided to make a big song and dance about it.

The exhibition, ‘Ode to the Sea: Art from Guantánamo Bay,’ featured artwork by eight former and current Guantánamo prisoners — four freed, and four still held — which was given by the prisoners to their lawyers and their families, and it was not until November that the Pentagon got upset, apparently because the promotional material for the exhibition provided an email address for anyone “interested in purchasing art from these artists.” The obvious conclusion should have been that “these artists” meant the released prisoners, who should be free to do what they want with their own artwork, but the Pentagon didn’t see it that way.

On November 15, as I explained in my first article about the controversy, a spokesman, Air Force Maj. Ben Sakrisson, said that “all Guantánamo detainee art is ‘property of the US government’ and ‘questions remain on where the money for the sales was going,’” while, at the prison itself, Navy Cmdr. Anne Leanos said in a statement that “transfers of detainee made artwork have been suspended pending a policy review.” Read the rest of this entry »

A New Media Milestone: 3,000 Articles Published (Including 2,200 on Guantánamo) Since I Began Writing Online as an Independent Journalist and Activist in 2007

Andy Worthington singing 'Song for Shaker Aamer' in Washington, D.C. in January 2016 (Photo: Justin Norman).Please support my work as a reader-funded journalist! I’m currently trying to raise $2500 (£2000) to support my writing and campaigning on Guantánamo and related issues over the next three months of the Trump administration.

 

Dear friends, supporters, and any stray passers-by,

My most recent article, WORLD EXCLUSIVE: Ex-Guantánamo Prisoner Salem Gherebi’s Letter Explaining Why He Voluntarily Returned to Libya from Senegal Despite the Danger in Doing So, was something of a milestone for me — my 3,000th article published here on my website since I first began publishing articles here, on an almost daily basis, nearly eleven years ago. 

Almost 2,200 of those articles have been about the prison at Guantánamo Bay and the men held there, the main focus of my work as a writer and a campaigner since the spring of 2006, when I began working on the manuscript for my book The Guantánamo Files, which I completed in May 2007, and which was published that September.

If you’ve been with me all that time — as some of you, perhaps, have been — you’ll know that I started publishing articles here after the fourth prisoner at Guantánamo died, a man named Abdul Rahman al-Amri, allegedly by committing suicide. After spending 14 months researching and writing about the prisoners, based on a forensic analysis of the many thousands of pages of information about them that the Pentagon had been obliged to release after they lost a Freedom of Information lawsuit, I think it’s fair to say that I knew more than anyone in the world about the prisoners at that point, but although I pitched a proposal to the Guardian, I was told that they’d pick up on the Associated Press’s wire, and so I published it myself, as I already had a website up and running (technically, a WordPress blog), and hoped people would notice. Read the rest of this entry »

WORLD EXCLUSIVE: Ex-Guantánamo Prisoner Salem Gherebi’s Letter Explaining Why He Voluntarily Returned to Libya from Senegal Despite the Danger in Doing So

Former Guantanamo prisoner Salem Gherebi, in a photo included in the classified military files released by WikiLeaks in 2011.Please support my work as a reader-funded journalist! I’m currently trying to raise $2500 (£2000) to support my writing and campaigning on Guantánamo and related issues over the next three months of the Trump administration.

 

Two weeks ago, I published an article about the Senegalese government’s disgraceful intention to repatriate two Libyans released from Guantánamo and given humanitarian asylum in Senegal two years ago, and expressed my alarm that doing so was a fundamental betrayal of the terms of the agreement made by the US when the men’s resettlement took place, which was supposed to guarantee that they wouldn’t be sent back to Libya, because of the dangerous instability in their home country.

That initial article drew on reporting by the Intercept, and also on correspondence with the former prisoner Omar Deghayes, a British resident and Libyan national who knows both men, and who I got to know during the filming, and subsequent touring of the documentary film I co-directed, ‘Outside the Law: Stories from Guantánamo,’ which was released in 2009. A week later the New York Times — and Omar Deghayes, again — confirmed that one of the two men, Salem Gherebi (aka Ghereby), had returned to Libya voluntarily, because he wanted to be reunited with his family, and because he hoped that his connections in the country would prevent him from coming to any harm. My update on the story is here.

Unfortunately, on his return, Salem Gherebi was imprisoned by a militia, Rada, that has a prison at Tripoli’s Mitiga Airport, where human rights abuses have been widely reported. The British NGO CAGE subsequently reported that the other Libyan, Omar Khalifa Mohammed Abu Bakr (aka Omar Mohammed Khalifh), who didn’t want to be repatriated, had also been sent back to Libya, where he too was imprisoned at the airport. I provided an update about this yesterday. Read the rest of this entry »

Sad Confirmation that Second Ex-Guantánamo Prisoner Resettled in Senegal Has Been Forcibly Returned to Libya, Where His Life Is At Risk

Omar Khalifa Mohammed Abu Bakr (aka Omar Mohammed Khalifh) and Salem Gherebi (aka Ghereby), Libyans resettled in Senegal in April 2016, who have now been sent back to Libya, which is not safe for them, and where they have been imprisoned. The photos are from the classified military files released by WikiLeaks in 2011.Please support my work as a reader-funded journalist! I’m currently trying to raise $2500 (£2000) to support my writing and campaigning on Guantánamo and related issues over the next three months of the Trump administration.

 

Two weeks ago, I reported the terrible news that two former Guantánamo prisoners, both Libyans, who had been given humanitarian asylum in Senegal two years ago, were about to be sent back to Libya by the Senegalese government. The two men, Omar Khalifa Mohammed Abu Bakr (aka Omar Mohammed Khalifh) and Salem Gherebi (aka Ghereby), had been approved for release by high-level US government review processes, but they had been resettled in Senegal because it was unsafe for them to be returned to Libya. In negotiations between the US State Department and the Senegalese government, the understanding was that their resettlement would not involve any efforts to repatriate them.

My initial information about the men’s dire situation came from the Intercept, and from discussions with the former prisoner Omar Deghayes, also Libyan, who I got to know well during the filming and touring of ‘Outside the Law: Stories from Guantánamo,’ the documentary film I co-directed with Polly Nash, which was released in 2009.

I continued to liaise with Omar Deghayes, and on April 5 the New York Times got involved, noting that Salem Gherebi had “apparently consented to repatriation,” and it would seem that he did so because he was desperate to be reunited with his wife and children, and was disappointed that they “had not been permitted to stay with him in Senegal,” and also believed he had connections that would protect him on his return. Read the rest of this entry »

A Devastating Condemnation of Guantánamo’s Military Commissions by Palestinian-American Journalist P. Leila Barghouty

An illustration by Hokyoung Kim for The Outline showing defense lawyers for Ammar al-Baluchi arriving at the home of Guantanamo's military commissions.Please support my work as a reader-funded journalist! I’m currently trying to raise $2500 (£2000) to support my writing and campaigning on Guantánamo and related issues over the next three months of the Trump administration.

 

I wrote the following article for the “Close Guantánamo” website, which I established in January 2012, on the 10th anniversary of the opening of Guantánamo, with the US attorney Tom Wilner. Please join us — just an email address is required to be counted amongst those opposed to the ongoing existence of Guantánamo, and to receive updates of our activities by email.

Six years and three months since Tom Wilner and I launched the Close Guantánamo campaign, we are becalmed in horribly unjust waters, with Donald Trump resolute that no one should leave the prison under any circumstances, and, as a result, 41 men held in what must appear to be a never-ending limbo, even though five of them were approved for release by high-level government review processes under President Obama, and another man, Ahmed al-Darbi, continues to be held despite being promised his release — to be re-imprisoned in Saudi Arabia — four years ago in a plea deal in his military commission trial.

Twenty-six other men are held indefinitely — and lawyers for some of them submitted a habeas corpus petition on their behalf on January 11, the 16th anniversary of the opening of the prison, on the basis that, as the New York-based Center for Constitutional Rights explained, “[Donald] Trump’s proclamation against releasing anyone from Guantánamo, regardless of their circumstances, which has borne out for the first full year of the Trump presidency, is arbitrary and unlawful and amounts to ‘perpetual detention for detention’s sake.’”

The other men still held — nine in total — have been through the military commission process, or are facing trials, and this latter category of Guantánamo prisoner came under the spotlight recently in an article written for a new website, The Outline, by P. Leila Barghouty, a journalist and filmmaker based in New York City, whose work has appeared on Al Arabiya, National Geographic, Slate, CNN, Vice News and Netflix. Read the rest of this entry »

Concrete Soldiers UK: Crowdfunding Campaign Continues for New Film Opposing Destruction of Social Housing, New Screenings Announced for April to June

A promotional poster for 'Concrete Soldiers UK', designed by the Artful Dodger. The film, directed by Nikita Woolfe, was released in December 2017, and a crowdfunder was launched in March 2018 to take the film on the road.Please support the crowdfunding campaign here!

Last year, the most significant event in the UK, to my mind, was the entirely preventable inferno that engulfed Grenfell Tower, a block of social housing in west London, killing over 70 people. Safety standards had been fatally eroded, in the search of easier profits, and the disaster put the spotlight firmly on central government, local government in Kensington and Chelsea, the management company responsible for the tower (and all of Kensington and Chelsea’s social housing), and the contractors involved in the refurbishment of the tower, all of whom had contributed to turning a safe block of social housing into a death trap.

In the wake of the disaster, I attended a powerful public meeting about the fire, called by ASH (Architects for Social Housing), tenacious defenders of social housing, where I met the filmmaker Nikita Woolfe, who filmed the event, and who was also making a documentary film, ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’, about the colossal but largely hidden threat to social housing that was also highlighted by the Grenfell disaster, which had shown how those living in social housing are regarded as second-class citizens by those who wield power in this country. 

Niki asked me to be the narrator of her film, and I was delighted to do so, as the film’s focus was of growing concern to me, as it examines the destruction — and the proposed destruction — of housing estates by councils shorn of funds by central government, who are entering into deals with private developers that involve the destruction of estates and their replacement with brand-new housing, pricing out existing tenants, and even offering such derisory amounts to leaseholders (those who bought their flats under Margaret Thatcher’s ‘Right to Buy’ policy) that they too are unable to afford to stay in the area. It is, to be blunt, social cleansing, and its proponents are driving what will be an epidemic if it is not resisted, in which tens of thousands — or hundreds of thousands — of Londoners will be driven from their homes, and variations on it are taking place across the whole of the UK.

Compounding the injustice of this social cleansing, the councils refuse to consider options — like those put forward by ASH — for refurbishment plans that can be paid for via infill building (additional building on existing sites), all the while pretending that tenants and leaseholders will be welcomed back to the new developments that replace their homes, when all the evidence from ‘regeneration’ programmes to date suggests that this is a blatant lie. Councils also claim that the new developments will reduce council waiting lists, but that too is untrue.

The film focuses in particular on two developments in south London — the destruction of the Aylesbury Estate in Southwark, and the proposed destruction of Central Hill Estate in Lambeth, both, it should be noted run by Labour councils, who are actually at the forefront of enthusiastic estate destruction. It also touches on the proposed destruction of another estate in Lambeth, Cressingham Gardens, and the destruction of the Heygate Estate in Southwark, a key stage in what some campaigners are now describing as “the London Clearances”, where Southwark Council entered into a deal with the international property developer Lendlease that has wiped out almost all social housing on the site. The Heygate site has now been renamed Elephant Park, and between them Lendlease and the council have socially cleansed the Elephant and Castle of almost all of the thousands of people who used to live there. Despite all this, the film also carries a hopeful message, and its focus on a successful campaign to prevent the destruction of a sheltered housing development in Streatham is an inspiring example of successful resistance.

‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ was launched at the Cinema Museum in Kennington in December, arriving as London’s housing crisis continued to demand attention — in Haringey, for example, where grassroots campaigners fought a successful battle against the Labour council entering into a housing deal with Lendlease that would have led to the destruction of numerous estates.

We have since had a handful screenings, in Deptford, Hackney Wick and Walthamstow, and have launched a crowdfunding campaign to enable us to take it out on the road and to produce a campaigning booklet detailing the pros and cons of resistance as we learn them from engagement with our audiences.

The link for the crowdfunding campaign is below. Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you’re interested in putting on a screening, and please be aware that one of the best ways to support us is to put on a screening and to make a donation to the crowdfunding campaign.

And below are the screenings that are currently confirmed — all over London, in Hastings, and in Edinburgh and Glasgow (as well as a film festival in Canada). We hope to see you somewhere along the way!

April 2018

Saturday April 14, 2018, 6pm: Screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ followed by Q&A with director Nikita Woolfe and Tania Charman
The Bridge Community Centre, 361 Priory Road, Hastings, East Sussex TN34 3NW.

This screening is organised by Heart of Hastings Community Land Trust, whose director, Tania Charman, attended the world premiere of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ at the Cinema Museum in Kennington, London SE11 on December 8, 2017.
The Facebook page is here.

Sunday April 15, 2018, 2pm: Screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ and ‘SA61-Home’ followed by Q&A with Nikita Woolfe and Wendy Charlton
Lordship Hub, Lordship Rec, off Higham Road, Tottenham, London, N17 6NU.

‘The screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ is also accompanied by a screening of SA61-Home’, an interview with a resident of the nearby Broadwater Farm Estate by local artist Wendy Charlton.
The event page is here, and the Facebook page is here.

Saturday April 21, 2018, 7pm: Screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ followed by Q&A with director Nikita Woolfe and narrator Andy Worthington
The Rotunda, Cressingham Gardens Estate, London SW2 2QG.

One of the estates featured in the film, Cressingham Gardens is at the forefront of the current resistance to estate destruction, as Lambeth Council vies with Southwark to be the most contemptuous of the needs of its social housing residents.
See a map here.

Sunday April 22, 2018, 4pm local time: Screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’
Cinematheque, 100 Arthur Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3B 1H3. Part of the Architecture + Design Film Festival (A+DFF), now in its sixth year.

See the website here.

Tuesday April 24, 2018, 6.30pm: Screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ followed by Q&A with director Nikita Woolfe and narrator Andy Worthington
The Wash Houses, The Cass School of Art, Architecture and Design, London Metropolitan University, 16 Goulston Street, London E1 7TP (entrance via Old Castle Street).

Presentation by the Cass Cities programme, co-directed by Jane Clossick and Mark Brierley, and the MA Architecture and Urbanism.
See the event page here, and book here via Eventbrite. As the event page states, “These issues are what MA Architecture and Urbanism students deal with in their activist projects. Come and join us for a taster of the problems London faces.”

Monday April 30, 2018, 7pm: Screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ followed by Q&A with director Nikita Woolfe and narrator Andy Worthington. Part of the New Cross and Deptford Free Film Festival.
Sanford Housing Co-Op, 4 Sanford Walk, New Cross, London SE14 6NB.

There will also be representatives of local campaigns — to save old Tidemill Garden and Reginald House in Deptford, and Achilles Street in New Cross. Both campaigns are part of ‘No Social Cleaning in Lewisham’ that Andy set up last November to support the campaigns to defend social housing in the borough of Lewisham.
The event page is here, and the Facebook page is here.
The day before, Sunday April 29, there will be a day of short films and live music in Old Tidemill Garden, and on Sunday May 13 there’s a ‘No Social Cleansing in Lewisham’ gig at the New Cross Inn, featuring The Four Fathers, the Commie Faggots, Ukadelix, Jazzman John, Asher Baker, The Wiz-RD and the Strawberry Thieves Socialist Choir.

May 2018

Friday May 18, 3pm, free: Screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ followed by Q&A with director Nikita Woolfe and narrator Andy Worthington.
50 George Square, Room G.04, University of Edinburgh, EH8 9LH.
Hosted by Living Rent and the Human Geography Research Group. Map here. Tweet announcing it here.

Friday May 18, 5.30pm, free: Screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ followed by Q&A with director Nikita Woolfe and narrator Andy Worthington.
The Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh College of Art, Main Building and Hunter Building, 74 Lauriston Place, Edinburgh EH3 9DF.
A second Edinburgh screening organised by Living Rent. See the website here for the Wee Red Bar, “accessed through a concealed entrance on Lady Lawson Street.”

Saturday May 19, 2pm-5pm, £5/£3: Screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ followed by Q&A with director Nikita Woolfe, narrator Andy Worthington and representatives of Living Rent
Kinning Park Complex, 43 Cornwall Street, Glasgow G41 1BA.

Screening organised by Living Rent Glasgow, part of Living Rent, a tenants’ union for Scotland, which describes itself as “a democratic organisation run by and for tenants.” As they state, “We want homes for people, not for profit; to redress the power imbalance between landlords and tenants; and ensure that everyone has decent and affordable housing. We believe in the collective power of tenants to come together to fight for their rights, and use diverse tactics – including direct action when necessary – to achieve this.”
Before the screening, there will be a radical art workshop run by Glasgow Art Group (GAG), “who have been active in community organising around housing”, where participants can “work together to produce artwork that also serves as a radical proposal against the onslaught of gentrification.”
The Facebook page for the event is here.

June 2018

Sunday June 3, 5pm, £3: Screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ and ‘Memories of Ladywell Baths’ followed by Q&A with director Nikita Woolfe and narrator Andy Worthington. Part of the Brockley Max Festival.
Good Hope Cafe, 261 Lewisham High Street, London SE13 6AY.

The screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ is at 5.30pm, and will be preceded by a screening of ‘Memories of Ladywell Baths’, about the currently derelict baths nearby, which “come back to life in this new, specially commissioned film by local filmmaker, David Stock, in collaboration with Lewisham Buildings Preservation Trust. From dance parties to boxing rings, midnight swims and floods, not to mention a few ghostly tales, hear the stories of this iconic building from those who were there.”
See the Brockley Max website here.

POSTSCRIPT:

Saturday June 16, all day, exact times tbc: Screening of ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’ followed by Q&A with director Nikita Woolfe
Firstsite Gallery, Lewis Gardens, High Street, Colchester, Essex CO1 1JH.
See the website here.

Andy Worthington is a freelance investigative journalist, activist, author, photographer, film-maker and singer-songwriter (the lead singer and main songwriter for the London-based band The Four Fathers, whose music is available via Bandcamp). He is the co-founder of the Close Guantánamo campaign (and see the latest photo campaign here) and the successful We Stand With Shaker campaign of 2014-15, and the author of The Guantánamo Files: The Stories of the 774 Detainees in America’s Illegal Prison (click on the following for Amazon in the US and the UK) and of two other books: Stonehenge: Celebration and Subversion and The Battle of the Beanfield. He is also the co-director (with Polly Nash) of the documentary film, “Outside the Law: Stories from Guantánamo” (available on DVD here — or here for the US), and for his photo project ‘The State of London’ he publishes a photo a day from six years of bike rides around the 120 postcodes of the capital.

In 2017, Andy became very involved in housing issues. He is the narrator of a new documentary film, ‘Concrete Soldiers UK’, about the destruction of council estates, and the inspiring resistance of residents, he wrote a song ‘Grenfell’, in the aftermath of the entirely preventable fire in June that killed over 70 people, and he also set up ‘No Social Cleansing in Lewisham’ as a focal point for resistance to estate destruction and the loss of community space in his home borough in south east London.

To receive new articles in your inbox, please subscribe to Andy’s RSS feed — and he can also be found on Facebook (and here), Twitter, Flickr and YouTube. Also see the six-part definitive Guantánamo prisoner list, The Complete Guantánamo Files, the definitive Guantánamo habeas list, the full military commissions list, and the chronological list of all Andy’s articles.

Please also consider joining the Close Guantánamo campaign, and, if you appreciate Andy’s work, feel free to make a donation.

Back to home page

Andy Worthington

Investigative journalist, author, campaigner, commentator and public speaker. Recognized as an authority on Guantánamo and the “war on terror.” Co-founder, Close Guantánamo, co-director, We Stand With Shaker. Also, singer and songwriter (The Four Fathers) and photographer.
Email Andy Worthington

CD: Love and War

Love and War by The Four Fathers

The Guantánamo Files book cover

The Guantánamo Files

The Battle of the Beanfield book cover

The Battle of the Beanfield

Stonehenge: Celebration & Subversion book cover

Stonehenge: Celebration & Subversion

Outside The Law DVD cover

Outside the Law: Stories from Guantánamo

RSS

Posts & Comments

World Wide Web Consortium

XHTML & CSS

WordPress

Powered by WordPress

Designed by Josh King-Farlow

Please support Andy Worthington, independent journalist:

Archives

In Touch

Follow me on Facebook

Become a fan on Facebook

Subscribe to me on YouTubeSubscribe to me on YouTube

Andy's Flickr photos

Campaigns

Categories

Tag Cloud

Afghans in Guantanamo Al-Qaeda Andy Worthington British prisoners CIA torture prisons Clive Stafford Smith Close Guantanamo David Cameron Donald Trump Four Fathers Guantanamo Hunger strikes London Military Commission NHS NHS privatisation Periodic Review Boards Photos President Obama Reprieve Shaker Aamer The Four Fathers Torture UK austerity UK protest US courts Video We Stand With Shaker WikiLeaks Yemenis in Guantanamo